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Category: Asthma

Continuous vs Intermittent ^-Agonists in the Treatment of Acute Adult Asthma: Summary

Thus, these findings argue against the routine use of continuous nebulization in the ED treatment of patients with acute asthma, and the decision to use one of these nebulization methods should be based on logistical and cost considerations. Overall, this Read More

Continuous vs Intermittent ^-Agonists in the Treatment of Acute Adult Asthma: Effects on Pulmonary Function

Results Sixty-two articles were identified in the initial search. Of these, reviewers found that 16 articles were potentially eligible. Most of the others were excluded because they were not clinical trials of patients with acute asthma. The reasons for subsequent Read More

Continuous vs Intermittent ^-Agonists in the Treatment of Acute Adult Asthma: Statistical Analysis

The two authors independently examined (title and abstract) the output generated from the search. Any potentially relevant articles were obtained, irrespective of the original language of publication. From the full text of potentially relevant articles, the reviewers assessed each study Read More

Continuous vs Intermittent ^-Agonists in the Treatment of Acute Adult Asthma

Inhaled (P2-agonists are the drugs of choice with which to treat patients with acute severe asthma. In comparison to the systemic approach, inhalation is associated with a more rapid onset of action and fewer systemic side effects. However, there are Read More

Association of Asthma Severity and Bronchial Hyperresponsiveness With a Polymorphism: Asthmatic airways

The first possible shortcoming of this study was that the methacholine challenge was performed in only 45 of 88 patients, which would have resulted in a selection bias. The most important reason for not performing the methacholine challenge concerned the Read More

Association of Asthma Severity and Bronchial Hyperresponsiveness With a Polymorphism: Discussion

In this study, the CTLA-4 promoter ( — 318 C/T) polymorphism was found to be associated with asthma severity, but not with asthma, atopy, or bronchial hyperresponsiveness. The CTLA-4 exon 1 (+ 49 A/G) polymorphism was shown to be associated Read More

Association of Asthma Severity and Bronchial Hyperresponsiveness With a Polymorphism: Polymorphism

The distributions of genotypic frequencies were significantly different for the mild-to-moderate group and the severe group. In particular, the frequency of the T allele was 7.4% in the mild-to-moderate group and 20.4% in the severe group, and the association between Read More

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