Category Archives: Cystic angiomatosis

Cystic angiomatosis of the bone appearing as intrathoracic lung masses: DISCUSSION (5)

There is no specific treatment for the bony lesions. Local radiation and chemotherapy have been used in progressive cases without any change in the clinical course of the disease. Corrective orthopedic procedures and treatment of pathological fractures are indicated. buy ortho tri-cyclen

Cystic angiomatosis of the bone appearing as intrathoracic lung masses: DISCUSSION (4)

osteolytic

The pathogenesis is not well understood but seems to favour the theory that these cystic lesions are the result of vascular malformations of congenital origin rather than representing true neoplasms , and that the osteolytic lesions are the result of pressure atrophy, hyperemia or progressive dilation of lymphatics with secondary bone resorption.

Cystic angiomatosis of the bone appearing as intrathoracic lung masses: DISCUSSION (3)

The pathological diagnosis of CAB should be made in association with typical radiographic findings and clinical features; it has been found that of all the bones that appear to be involved, the rib provides the highest diagnostic yield . Macroscopically, the lesion may resemble a typical bone cyst.

Cystic angiomatosis of the bone appearing as intrathoracic lung masses: DISCUSSION (2)

The typical course of CAB in patients without visceral involvement is relatively benign and compatible with a long life span. When there is both visceral and skeletal involvement, there may be a progressive course that can lead to an early death . Although there have been reports of cases of spontaneous regression, the majority of these patients had skeletal involvement only .

Cystic angiomatosis of the bone appearing as intrathoracic lung masses: DISCUSSION (1)

lymphangiomatosis

Cystic angiomatosis of the bone is a rare but pathologically distinct entity characterized by multiple cysts scattered diffusely throughout the skeleton, which are often associated with similar changes in other tissues, notably the spleen. A wide variety of diagnostic terms such as ‘lymphangiomatosis’, ‘hemangiomatosis’ and ‘hamartous lymphangiomatosis’ of the bone have been used; however, the term ‘CAB’ is preferred because some cases have been described that contained either isolated hemangiomas or lymphangiomas, or a mixture of both vascular components. In addition, it is often impossible to differentiate hemangioma from lymphangioma, not only histopathologically but also clinically and radiologically. birth control pills

Cystic angiomatosis of the bone appearing as intrathoracic lung masses (2)

She was aware of mild postnasal drip and had no symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux. Her exercise tolerance was normal. On physical examination, her chest had hard palpable masses over the right fifth and left third ribs. The remainder of the examination was normal. Routine complete blood count (CBC), liver function tests and chemistry, including calcium, were all normal. Office spirometry showed a forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) of 2.6 L/s and a forced vital capacity (FVC) of 3.2 L/s. A methacholine challenge was positive at 4 mg and showed mild to moderate airway hyperreactivity.

Cystic angiomatosis of the bone appearing as intrathoracic lung masses (1)

Cystic angiomatosis of the bone (CAB) is a rare, multi-centric disease that involves both the vascular and lymphatic systems, producing diffuse cystic lesions in the skeleton that are often accompanied by visceral involvement, especially the spleen. As of 1999, 56 cases have been reported in the medical literature.