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Category: Pulmonary

Bronchial Aspirates in the Diagnosis of Pulmonary Tuberculosis: Conclusion

Our results are comparable with the results of other studies performed on sputum specimens, which showed about 50% sensitivity of DAT in AFB smear-negative patients. Further study is needed to compare the diagnostic efficacy of DATs between sputum and bronchial Read More

Bronchial Aspirates in the Diagnosis of Pulmonary Tuberculosis: Tuberculosis patients

However, because bronchoscopy is usually required in cases of smear-negative, low-colony-count tuberculosis, it seems that the patient population in this study can be compared to actual clinical situations we meet in everyday practice. Of 13 smear-positive tuberculosis patients, 5 patients Read More

Bronchial Aspirates in the Diagnosis of Pulmonary Tuberculosis: Fiberoptic bronchoscopes

In this study, we used an automatic bronchoscope washer, with 2% glutaraldehyde as the disinfectant agent. The disinfection time was 10 min between uses, and 23 min after completion of daily use. The disinfection time between uses was somewhat shorter Read More

Bronchial Aspirates in the Diagnosis of Pulmonary Tuberculosis: bronchoscopes

In these cases, it has been suggested that the disinfection procedures used were not performed thoroughly before the use of the bronchoscopes on subsequent patients. Carricajo et al showed experimentally that it is possible to obtain positive amplification results for Read More

Bronchial Aspirates in the Diagnosis of Pulmonary Tuberculosis: Discussion

In this study, we have shown that automatic bronchoscopic washing, including 10 min of a disinfection cycle using 2% glutaraldehyde, did not cause false-positive results or cross-contamination in amplification techniques or bacteriological tests for M tuberculosis. COBAS AMPLICOR, the commercial Read More

Bronchial Aspirates in the Diagnosis of Pulmonary Tuberculosis: Discrepant Analysis

Six patients had false-positive CA results. However, considering the sequence of bronchoscopy, the order of bronchoscope washing, and the result of outward PCR analysis, there was no evidence of contamination through the bronchoscopes or bronchoscope washer. Of the six patients Read More

Bronchial Aspirates in the Diagnosis of Pulmonary Tuberculosis: AFB

In AFB smear-negative patients, the sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of CA tests were 38%, 99%, 74%, and 94%, respectively. Overall, the sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of CA tests were 53%, 98%, 81%, and 94%, respectively. In nine patients Read More

Bronchial Aspirates in the Diagnosis of Pulmonary Tuberculosis: Results

Because bacteriologic study of sputum or bronchial aspirate specimens was not performed in 4 patients (8 specimens), a total of 331 patients (392 bronchial aspirate specimens) were included in this study (Table 1). Bacteriologic study of sputum and bronchial aspirate Read More

Bronchial Aspirates in the Diagnosis of Pulmonary Tuberculosis: Outward PCR Analysis

In one case with a positive CA result in which contamination was suspected through the washing procedure, outward PCR genetic relatedness was tested by molecular fingerprinting employing the IS6110-based outward PCR method. In brief, outward PCR employed the single primer Read More

Bronchial Aspirates in the Diagnosis of Pulmonary Tuberculosis: Data Analysis

After the magnetic particles are washed to remove unbound material, avidin-horseradish peroxidase conjugate binds to the biotin-labeled amplicon captured by the specific DNA probe. After removing unbound conjugates by washing, substrate is added. Specimens with A660 > 0.35 are interpreted Read More

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