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The Overlap Between Respiratory Bronchiolitis and Desquamative Interstitial Pneumonia: Results Summary of the Two Index Cases

Correlations between the extent of RB/DIP-like changes (0 to 100% involvement of biopsy) and total pack-years smoked was performed using linear regression analysis and the Pearson correlation coefficient. Similarly, correlations between the extent of RB/DIP-like changes and pulmonary function variables Read More

The Overlap Between Respiratory Bronchiolitis and Desquamative Interstitial Pneumonia: HRCT

When present, the distribution of the abnormalities such as adenopathy and emphysema was recorded. Surgical lung biopsy specimens were reviewed by a pathologist (T.V.C.) blinded to the findings on HRCT. Accumulation of pigmented macrophages in airspaces and around respiratory bronchioles Read More

The Overlap Between Respiratory Bronchiolitis and Desquamative Interstitial Pneumonia: Materials and Methods

The medical record of two index patients with PLCH associated with marked RB/DIP-like changes on biopsy were reviewed and summarized. To further characterize the relationship between RB/DIP and PLCH, we searched the Mayo Clinic database and identified 10 additional cases Read More

The Overlap Between Respiratory Bronchiolitis and Desquamative Interstitial Pneumonia

Pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis (PLCH) is an uncommon interstitial lung disorder that occurs almost exclusively in smokers. Cigarette smoking has also been implicated in the development of respiratory bronchiolitis (RB)-associated interstitial lung disease (ILD) [RB-ILD] and desquamative interstitial pneumonia (DIP), Read More

Thrombin, Inflammation, and Cardiovascular Disease: Conclusions

This statistical association may be mediated by the key proinflammatory cytokine (also an adipokine) TNF-a, which is a so-called first-wave cytokine influencing IL-6 production, as well as many other cellular functions. TNF-a receptor (TNFR) I signals programmed cell death, while Read More

Thrombin, Inflammation, and Cardiovascular Disease: Inflammatory cytokines

The exact mechanism for the association of CRP with coagulation status is not clear; however the work of Ritchie and colleagues suggests a possible pathway. Monocytes appear capable of binding FDPs and subsequently producing IL-6, which goes to the liver Read More

Thrombin, Inflammation, and Cardiovascular Disease: Metabolic Syndrome

In some cases, there are significant differences in the strengths of association. Also, each marker may participate in the CVD process in a different way. In a side-by-side comparison, CRP had the strongest risk prediction, but a meta-analysis observed no Read More

Thrombin, Inflammation, and Cardiovascular Disease: Risk prediction to CRP

However, a wide variety of activities, such as innate immunity, coagulation, and others, fall under the term inflammation. Each of these activities plays an important role in our response to trauma and/or environmental challenge: coagulation and fibrinolysis in restricting blood Read More

Thrombin, Inflammation, and Cardiovascular Disease: CRP or fibrinogen

We should note that “inflammation” as the term is used here does not mean the full form of the condition (warmth, redness, swelling, and pain), but rather implies a “micro-inflammation.” A person with this condition is characterized by being in Read More

Thrombin, Inflammation, and Cardiovascular Disease: Inflammation Markers and CVD Risk

PAI-1 levels are associated with insulin, suggesting that the role of PAI-1 may be particularly important in people with the metabolic syndrome or type 2 diabetes. The regulation of PAI-1 levels—at least in blood—is in part mediated by regulators of Read More

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