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Tag: coagulation

Thrombin, Inflammation, and Cardiovascular Disease: Conclusions

This statistical association may be mediated by the key proinflammatory cytokine (also an adipokine) TNF-a, which is a so-called first-wave cytokine influencing IL-6 production, as well as many other cellular functions. TNF-a receptor (TNFR) I signals programmed cell death, while Read More

Thrombin, Inflammation, and Cardiovascular Disease: Inflammatory cytokines

The exact mechanism for the association of CRP with coagulation status is not clear; however the work of Ritchie and colleagues suggests a possible pathway. Monocytes appear capable of binding FDPs and subsequently producing IL-6, which goes to the liver Read More

Thrombin, Inflammation, and Cardiovascular Disease: Metabolic Syndrome

In some cases, there are significant differences in the strengths of association. Also, each marker may participate in the CVD process in a different way. In a side-by-side comparison, CRP had the strongest risk prediction, but a meta-analysis observed no Read More

Thrombin, Inflammation, and Cardiovascular Disease: Risk prediction to CRP

However, a wide variety of activities, such as innate immunity, coagulation, and others, fall under the term inflammation. Each of these activities plays an important role in our response to trauma and/or environmental challenge: coagulation and fibrinolysis in restricting blood Read More

Thrombin, Inflammation, and Cardiovascular Disease: CRP or fibrinogen

We should note that “inflammation” as the term is used here does not mean the full form of the condition (warmth, redness, swelling, and pain), but rather implies a “micro-inflammation.” A person with this condition is characterized by being in Read More

Thrombin, Inflammation, and Cardiovascular Disease: Inflammation Markers and CVD Risk

PAI-1 levels are associated with insulin, suggesting that the role of PAI-1 may be particularly important in people with the metabolic syndrome or type 2 diabetes. The regulation of PAI-1 levels—at least in blood—is in part mediated by regulators of Read More

Thrombin, Inflammation, and Cardiovascular Disease: Atherothrombosis

While it remains unproven whether any of these mechanisms are actually at play in situ, given all the available data it seems likely that higher fibrinogen may well not only reflect the low-grade inflammation caused by the atherothrombosis, but also Read More

Thrombin, Inflammation, and Cardiovascular Disease: CVD risk

To support this position, studies of the plasma levels of prothrombin (a key procoagulant protein, but not an inflammation-sensitive protein) and/or the prothrombin G20210A genotype associated with plasma levels, generally have been null for CVD risk in most cases while Read More

Thrombin, Inflammation, and Cardiovascular Disease: Atherosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Inflammation

There Is a Complex Interplay Among Atherosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Inflammation Atherosclerotic coronary heart disease commonly manifests itself clinically via a thrombotic event: so-called “atherothrombosis,” especially in younger men. As mentioned above, this has been clearly understood only since the early Read More

Thrombin, Inflammation, and Cardiovascular Disease: Thrombotic disease

Overall, a meta-analysis demonstrated moderate risk prediction for d-dimer. The most likely interpretation of these data are that the degree of atherosclerosis and vascular damage causes changes in coagulation status, not vice versa; ie, it does not appear that a Read More

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